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MOMAR NDAO

DVM, MSc, PhD
Associate Professor, McGill University 

Dr. Momar Ndao completed his veterinary studies in Senegal, and Diploma in Tropical Medicine, MSc and PhD in International Health and Tropical Diseases at Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp. He is currently an Associate Professor at McGill University in the Faculty of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine and Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He has served as Director of the Canadian National Reference Centre for Parasitology (NRCP) since 2002. He is Chair of the Facility Animal Care Committee (FACC) Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre Glen site since 2014. Selected as member of the Expert Working Group for the Canadian Biosafety Standards and Guidelines, and Co-chair of the Food and Environmental Parasitology Network (Health Canada) among others. He is member of the executive board of the World Federation of Parasitologists since 2014, member of the executive board of the International Federation of Tropical Medicine since 2017, member of the Scientific Committee of Pasteur Institute since 2016 and also member of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene since 1999.

CURRENT AREAS OF STUDY

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VACCINE DEVELOPMENT FOR SCHISTOSOMIASIS

There are nearly one billion people at risk of infection with schistosomiasis. Currently there is only one FDA approved drug to treat this helminth and no prophylactic vaccines. We are developing both traditional and non-conventional vaccine candidates and testing them in our well-established preclinical infection model.

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VACCINE DEVELOPMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIOSIS

Cryptosporidium is a microscopic parasite which causes diarrheal disease and can be found globally. We are developing a live attenuated cryptosporidium vaccine candidate with virulence factors knocked out in an attempt to stop this infection before it begins.

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TARGETING CHAGAS DISEASE USING PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS

Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. As an extracellular blood parasite which can be vertically spread from mother to child, new diagnostics and vaccines are necessary to prevent transmission. We are using proteomic analysis to identify new vaccine candidates to protect from infection. 

FUNDING

Our lab is supported by a variety of funding sources. We would like to acknowledge the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the R. Howard Webster Foundation, the McGill University Health Centre and its core facilities, and the Foundation of the McGill University Health Centre. 


The National Reference Centre for Parasitology is supported by Public Health Agency of Canada/National Microbiology Laboratory, the Foundation of the Montreal General Hospital, the Foundation of the McGill University Health Centre, the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, and the R. Howard Webster Foundation.

We would also like to thank all of our collaborators both internal and international. 

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